The Brink causes backlash in Pakistan for portraying the country in a negative way

It has already been cancelled – but you won’t catch any reruns in Pakistan.

Jack Black and Tim Robbins’ series The Brink has come under fire in the south Asian country where it is partially set.

According to a report by NBC news, the political comedy was slammed by native critics who said the show ‘portrayed the country in a negative and one-dimensional way’.

In trouble: Jack Black and Tim Robbins’ comedy series The Brink has caused a backlash in Pakistan for ‘reinforcing stereotypes’

The series follows United States Secretary of State Walter Larson, played by Robbins,  who is forced to rely on a lowly Foreign Service Officer assigned to the US Embassy in Islamabad, played by Black, when tensions break out in the area.

NBC claimed both a cable TV provider and one of the country’s leading pirate DVD franchises have both been advised by ‘the powers that be’ not to air or sell the show.

‘We have been advised to not run this, either in regular cable or in video on-demand services we offer,’ said one staff member at the Islamabad-based cable operator, who did not want to be identified for fear of reprisals.

Plot: The series follows United States Secretary of State Walter Larson, played by Robbins, who is forced to rely on a lowly Foreign Service Officer assigned to the US Embassy in Islamabad, played by Black, when tensions break out in the area

Slammed: According to a report by NBC news , the political comedy was slammed by native critics who said the show ‘portrayed the country in a negative and one-dimensional way’. Black is pictured here with Aasif Mandvi, an Indian actor cast in the only main Pakistani role, which irked some.

A sales manager for Illusions, the pirate DVD vendor, who also did not want to be named for the same reasons, told the news site that the Brink was received in much the same way Homeland was.

‘Homeland was awful for Pakistan. The Brink is funnier, but no better [for the country’s image],’ he said

‘After Homeland, we were advised by “the powers that be” to take it off the shelves. But we still stock [the show], though not on display.’

Effigy: NBC claimed both a cable TV provider and one of the country’s leading pirate DVD franchises have both been advised by ‘the powers that be’ not to air or sell the show

Not happy: Pakistan’s embassy in Washington accused the show of ‘maligning’ Pakistan and said that it ‘reinforces stereotypes’

Pakistan’s embassy in Washington accused the show of ‘maligning’ Pakistan and said that it ‘reinforces stereotypes’.

‘This is also an affront to the people and institutions in both countries who have invested a lot over the decades in blood and treasure in building this important and mutually beneficial relationship,’ embassy spokesperson Nadeem Hotiana said.

He also criticised the ‘repeated insinuations that an intelligence agency of Pakistan is complicit in protecting the terrorists at the expense of innocent Pakistani civilians’.

Mis-cast: Several Pakistanis also voiced their disapproval on Twitter, with some pointing out that many of the show’s Pakistani characters are played by actors from arch rival India

Gone: After premiering on HBO in June, a second series was initially ordered before the network changed its mind and cancelled it

Several Pakistanis also voiced their disapproval on Twitter, with some pointing out that many of the show’s Pakistani characters are played by actors from arch rival India.

After premiering on HBO in June, a second series was initially ordered before the network changed its mind and cancelled it.

Each series was supposed to follow the same characters dealing with a new crisis in a different part of the world.

Bad light: Homeland, which stars Claire Danes, also came under fire for the same reasons

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